This page describes coyote barking as opposed to howling which can be found by pressing “Coyote Howling” in the index above.


I have only heard coyotes barking in the manner recorded here -- when they have been chased or otherwise intruded upon by a dog. Some people think, “Well, coyotes do that, they howl and they bark”. Yes, they do, but always there is a cause, and the only cause that I have ever seen in our parks in three years is when a dog intrudes on them on some level. Very recently I’ve seen the cause, which still always is about dogs, expand somewhat. The first instances included antagonistic dogs simply coming in too close, without actually chasing the coyote.


And now I’ve seen coyotes react to specific dogs walking about 100 feet away. I’ve noticed that the coyote reacts to dogs that have chased it or intruded on it in the past. But also, now, I’m seeing that a coyote will feel intruded upon if specific dogs “eye” the coyote on its perch -- possibly in an antagonistic way -- something like giving the coyote “the evil eye”. In addition to the complaining and standing up for itself which I’ve seen when a dog actually chases it, the coyote’s barking at these intrusive dogs may also be a statement to them of territoriality.


This recording is of an entire barking session -- a short one. These barking episodes can go on for 20 minutes or longer. This one lasted only about four minutes. To the right of the long recording I have recordings of just the “shrill” part o this type of bark, and then just the “gruffer” part. I have not edited these, they just happened to occur like this, which is why I’m putting them in here.


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Male and Female Coyotes Barking Together


I'm including this recording of a "barking duet” to show the slight difference in male and female coyote voices. The female has a "ra-ra-ra-ra" type of bark and a very high pitched, continuous tremolo. Her voice fills most of the recording, with the male's interspersed. The male has a deeper bark -- more like a barking dog's. The grunts are his. His tremolos are always short, as if he can't quite keep them going -- there are only a few of them: at 17 seconds, 101, 222 and I think 227.

Coyote Barking Session

“barking” part

“shrill” part of bark

Female Coyote Barking